star

In the last 30 years, China has transformed itself into one of the world’s leaders in political, economic and social relations. With Australia a hotspot for Chinese immigrants, understanding the cultural nuances, both from an Australian and a Chinese perspective, is now more important than ever. Your next hire or business deal could depend on it.

Australia is a young country built on immigration and cultural assimilation, and whether they are new immigrants or Australian born, in the workforce or the property market, or in the suburbs or the city, the ‘new Chinese’ are now an integral part of this culture. Experience their incredible transformation, told through the personal story of author Barry Li.

Written from his own ‘grassroots’ perspective, Li’s story and his observations and thoughts provide valuable insights into an important and exciting force for change in Australia. The ‘new Chinese’ are changing the world.

Glenda Korporaal Associate Editor — Business
The Australian

‘The New Chinese’ covers in detail;

  • How to navigate cultural differences between Australia and china
  • What four generations of Chinese are present in Australia
  • Why political sensitivities should be observed by those doing business with China
  • How Chinese consumers and investors spend their wealth
  • What challenges are in store for China’s future.

Barry Li was born in China a few years after the end of the Cultural Revolution, living 22 years in Qitaihe, Suzhou and later Beijing before deciding to complete his higher education studies in Australia. After graduation and a few years’ work in Australia, in 2010 he returned with his wife, Zhen, to China, to find a country transformed by an economic boom that showed no sign of slowing. Finding no place for themselves in the new China, the following year they returned to Australia to create a permanent home in Sydney.

Barry Li Author - The New Chinese

Written from his own ‘grassroots’ perspective, Li’s story and his observations and thoughts provide valuable insights into an important and exciting force for change in Australia. The ‘new Chinese’ are changing the world.

Glenda Korporaal Associate Editor — Business
The Australian

‘The New Chinese’ covers in detail;

  • How to navigate cultural differences between Australia and china
  • What four generations of Chinese are present in Australia
  • Why political sensitivities should be observed by those doing business with China
  • How Chinese consumers and investors spend their wealth
  • What challenges are in store for China’s future.

Barry Li was born in China a few years after the end of the Cultural Revolution, living 22 years in Qitaihe, Suzhou and later Beijing before deciding to complete his higher education studies in Australia. After graduation and a few years’ work in Australia, in 2010 he returned with his wife, Zhen, to China, to find a country transformed by an economic boom that showed no sign of slowing. Finding no place for themselves in the new China, the following year they returned to Australia to create a permanent home in Sydney.

Barry Li Author - The New Chinese

read a short excerpt from the book.

This is a true story. It is a story about me, a very ordinary Chinese man. I was never physically tortured or persecuted by the ‘evil communist regime’, but still I had to ‘escape’ from China for a better life. It also tells the story of what has happened inside China since the Cultural Revolution, especially during the past 30 years when it has grown from one of the poorest developing countries to the world’s second largest economy. Finally, it tells the story of how a new-generation Chinese migrant finds his place in Australian society and works towards his Australian dream.

read more

free shipping*
$29.95

All rights reserved. Except as permitted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (for example, a fair dealing for the purposes of study, research, criticism or review), no part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, communicated or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written permission. All inquiries should be made to the publisher at the address above.